Koi-Zone

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Koi Diseases (Bacterial)

Regular observation of your fish will allow problems to be detected early. Be familiar with your fish's normal shape, size and color as well as swimming habits.
A change in these factors may signal a problem. The problem must be identified in order to know the steps to take for treatment. Every pond owner with fish, at some time or another, will probably have to medicate their pond.

Though Koi and Goldfish are extremely hardy, it is very important to keep a watch on their environment to keep them at their healthiest.

Attention should be paid to the quality of water and balance of the pond (i.e. pH levels etc.). However, if problems do occur, the first step is to remove the individual fish or decide whether to treat the entire pond.

It is sometimes difficult to be aware of a problem with a fish until its too late. Be aware of your fish's behavior patterns so changes can be detected early. A change in your fish's behavior is usually the first sign that that your fish are stressed or ill.

It is important that you know your pond's volume. All treatments are based on the number of gallons in the pond. The wrong dosage could result in killing your fish.
Cotton Wool Disease

Cotton Wool Disease

Columnaris (Flexibacter columnaris) or Cotton Wool Disease is another bacterial infection. The common name comes from the white tufts that develop around the mouth and spread to the body and fins, often leading to ulcers and a thin appearance. Often mistaken for a fungal infection because of its...(click on product image for more details)
Dropsy or Pine-Cone Disease

Dropsy or Pine-Cone Disease

Raised scales (rather like a pine cone) and eyes standing out from the head. Dropsy itself is not a disease, but rather a result of some other cause. Dropsy is a term given to the swelling that occurs internally in the fish. There are multiple possible causes. Sometimes it's not contageous, but sick fish...(click on product image for more details)
Finrot and Ulcers

Finrot and Ulcers

A number of bacteria are associated with finrot, lesions and internal hemorrhaging, notably Aeromonas and Pseudomonas. Ulcers usually start at the site of an injury, the bacteria then infect it causing further damage, and fungal infection can also occur. Such holes result in osmoregulatory problems,...(click on product image for more details)